HOPE in the TIME of AIDS: The Film

To see a 25 minute film that I wrote and co-directed with my good friend Tim Hardy, produced by the unstoppable Alison Lawton, and narrated by the wonderfully generous Pierce Brosnan, go to Mindset Media.

The film is on flash, so when you get to Mind Set, go down near the bottom and click Tools For Change, and then press the the fourth box over called Hope in the Time of AIDS (watch clip). It’s actually the entire 25 minutes, which is so good to be out there.

If you put yourself in the shoes of those with HIV and AIDS who are willing to talk about it, their courage and honesty (and beauty) becomes even more astounding.

The film features the Head of UNICEF Canada, Nigel Fisher, Stephen Lewis and many other deeply committed people.

Pass it on, if you’re moved to do so. May all sentient beings be happier and healthier. Lots of love to you,

Pete xox

Press here to hear Be Brave Tonight. Press here to hear Wide Open.

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2 Responses to “HOPE in the TIME of AIDS: The Film”

  1. Karen says:

    Hi Pete,

    That was 25 minutes well spent. What a beautiful job on the writing. Your loving fingerprints are certainly all over that one. Kudos, also, to Tim Hardy and the rest of the crew. No one does it alone.

    But more so to the two gentle children who were open and brave enough to share their stories. What amazing grace those young girls demonstrate in the face of such extreme conditions. Why is it when adults screw up, so often it’s the children who are hurt? From divorces that turn into all out wars to wars that completely erode the family structure in its wake, it’s usually the children who suffer the most. How often, in the throes of passionate emotions, adults forget their effect on the children around them.

    I truly don’t understand why because our best chance as a society to effect real change is to, by example, engrain those changes in our children as we raise them to be strong and competent. But, what do I know? I guess it could be one’s choice to engrain violence and selfishness into one’s child.

    I’m also blown away by how simple it can be to help in at least a small way. Ten bucks buys a mosquito net that can protect several children from malaria for three to five years (Project Mosquito Net website) and according to the Clinton Foundation website, in October 2003, agreements were struck with five generic ARV suppliers to cut the price of the triple-drug therapy most frequently used to less than $140 per person per year. I spent more than $140 on my groceries last week.

    We, in the “developed world? (Like “third world? countries are a different planet. Even the terminology is alienating.) are blessed with so much and are capable of giving so much. One less gift under the tree for each family member could help improve the lives of several people for a year. So simple, so painless, and you pass on the gift of compassion and generosity to your children. Where’s the negative?

    What is our collective problem?

    Livin’, lovin’, laughin’,
    Karen

    P.S. Speaking of well-made films, has the writer, director, producer of “See Grace Fly” obtained a copy of the elusive DVD yet? If not, I could attend that convention near me, seek an audience with Mr. McGillion, request two copies and we could both be done with this. Would you like yours autographed?

    Seriously though, any news yet on how we mere mortals can get a copy of the DVD?

    Thanks,
    Karen

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