THE PLIGHT OF REFUGEES, INTERNALLY PLACED PERSONS and BEING HUMAN

In June 2008, after a night of terror in a refugee camp for Darfur refugees in Chad (terror perpetrated by refugees living there), a group of courageous women living there decided to speak out. They created a document that has come to be called the Farchana Manifesto.

This short piece tells their story and discusses some of the problems with long-term refugee camps, a lack of refugee rights, a lack of citizenship, IDPs (internally displaced people), the treatment of women and the pressures and demands on the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees).

At the end there are a also a few more refugee/IDP statistics (footnotes to the right of the piece) from around the world. The numbers of Iraqis forced from their homes since the American invasion of 2003 is worth knowing, and its interesting to see which countries are willing to take in the most refugees.

There’s an informative interview on Iraq refugees from the wonderful journalist Deborah Campbell on Democracy Now here, from 2008.

Ivan Gayton, the friend I interviewed at the beginning of the piece (and who interviewed the unnamed and inspiring and courageous refugee woman above), is as far as I know in a deeply disrupted Pakistan right now, I think Peshawar, doing humanitarian work. I emailed him a week or so ago, I will try again today, and I’m hoping to hear back soon. if I hear from him, I’ll offer what updates I can.

Wishing you, and all sisters and brothers, lots of love, awareness, compassion and freedom,

Pete

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One Response to “THE PLIGHT OF REFUGEES, INTERNALLY PLACED PERSONS and BEING HUMAN”

  1. Karen says:

    Hi Pete,

    Please let us know that Mr. Gayton is doing well.

    Do you know if the women who created the Farchana Manifesto, in particular the amazing woman who had the conviction to appear on film, are still safe and well? Has any change come about as a result of their courage?

    Also interesting about the number of refugees other countries take in is the reasons for doing so and the reasons for refusing to take any more. Protect the tribe.

    2003! It seems impossible that it’s been that long. Think back to where you were in 2003. So much has happened, yet the devastation drags on.

    We squeak resistance with little hope of being heard. But at least some of us squeak.

    Love to you and those you love,
    Karen

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